Connecting Financial Independence with Environmentalism

Yesterday was Earth Day. Every day is Earth Day.

A part of the path to FIRE (Financial Independence Retire Early) involves consuming less and this really resonates with me. It’s not being frugal to save money, but it’s being frugal to really think about what you need versus want while considering the true value of each purchase. I haven’t been too great at this lately, but all big purchases get scrutinized for their value.

I’ve written about the every day things we do without – cable, subscriptions, expensive cell phone bills, eating out, etc. – and the big ticket items we’re doing without – kitchen remodel and pretty much any large home remodel that applies to this old house. Obviously none of these things are necessary, so these aren’t tough decisions. We have debt and spending money on anything else seems foolish.

And I can be foolish. This laptop I’m using is physically breaking down with missing parts, dents and dings, and running very slow at times. Couple that with a very persistent, soon to be birthday boy asking for a gaming laptop. And we’re getting one. What’s the value in that? Our family laptop will die and now we have one that the kids won’t complain about. There’s a lot of value in that.

But, I digress. Back to the planet.

nc sunset.jpg

 

Listening to NPR’s Living Green segment yesterday got me thinking there’s more we, as a family, can do. Computers aside, I think we’re pretty good with our environmentally-friendly and frugal and then, sometimes we’re not.

  • Paper products: We use cotton napkins, but we always have a roll of paper towels. Keeping cotton napkins, cloths and rags handy will help reduce that waste.
  • Compost: We don’t. We did in Seattle but in our Philly ‘burb, it’s available, but cost prohibitive. We have room in our yard to do something about this. I’ve composted yard waste, but I’d like to get a vessel so we can compost food waste, too.
  • Food: I’ve been trying to cut out meat during the week, but sometimes the convenience of cooking what we know wins. We can make a more concerted effort on this.
  • Water: We do wash a lot and we don’t have an efficient machine. We adjust the water levels, but it’ll be interesting to see if we save any water by running full loads only.
  • Clothes: I need to find a second hand store I like!
  • Stuff: We have too much! It drives me nuts. I need to purge and minimize. I feel like I’m always doing this, but I’m not making progress. I will start with one room at a time, working from the top (bedrooms) to bottom (basement).
  • Plastic: Stop buying the ziploc bags and use reusable containers and bees wax wraps.

I’m going to see if my library has All You Need is Less – this book was mentioned in the radio show.

I think the food and clothes will yield the biggest cost savings, but it’s not about the cost, it’s about the planet and, in turn, our health.

The Financial Rewards of Job Arbitrage

​Since my last post three months ago, we’ve hit a bit of a bump, but at the end of the day, it will get us to FI sooner.

Good-bye office view!

At the end of July, I knew I would be out of a job in 30 days. Not really ideal, but also not an ideal job. It was the kick I needed to high tail my job search, seeking a change in industry and location for the reasons listed below. After many applications and even more interviews, I got an amazing job offer just six days after leaving my job. This provided a 4-week, unpaid break in which I was able to knock out a lot of the household “To Do” items, but was a little financially tough.
This career change was necessary for my mental health, but was also FI-driven:

  • Geoarbitrage 1: Change from working in the city to the ‘burbs = save 3.5456% in city wage tax
  • Geoarbitrage 2: Change commute from daily $10/day train or $10/day parking to 25-minute drive with free parking = save $200/month ($2400 annual savings)
  • Job Arbitrage: 8.9% salary increase with signing bonus, annual bonus and employee stock purchase option

This is all pretty awesome and we’re in the process of adjusting our finances to ensure we take advantage of and max out our pre-tax contributions. And, more exciting, updating our spreadsheets and FI timeline.
Another financial advantage of this change was our shift to my husbands insurance. We were pre-FI when we chose our insurance with my old employer. Being on the path, we’re scrutinizing the details. We chose to stay on a high-deductible plan, but switched to his employer for these added benefits:

NEXT: I feel like the list of actions we need to take keeps growing. Here are the top three:

Changing jobs (and changing industries) is hard and it’s a lot of work, but because we’ve made some less-than-financially-ideal decisions in our past, we have to keep working for now. I love my new job and the financial rewards; the path to FI is getting clearer!